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What Keeps Mexico's Drug Traffickers 'In The Game?' →

Furthermore, Mexico’s drug trade employs an estimated 500,000 people, so even if the ni-nis all found jobs are started school tomorrow, the nation would still be saddled with a huge number of dangerous criminals. Eliminating such a large group via arrests and confrontations is, of course, plainly impossible; to reduce the size of the population living off of the drug trade, Mexico’s government needs to ease and encourage the transition away from drug production.

— hace 2 años

Las Farc difunden un desafiante rap en video sobre la paz en Colombia (por Noticiero LA F.m.)

— hace 2 años con 1 nota
"In Latin America, the graphic shows that the biggest importers of ammunition are, not surprisingly, Peru and Colombia, two countries at war. But whereas Colombia’s imports were relatively steady in the last three years, Peru out-imported Colombia by close to $10 million in 2010, perhaps a reflection of that government’s increasing concerns about the Shining Path guerrilla group."
— hace 2 años
"After weeks of rumored negotiations, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos has confirmed that the government will begin peace talks with the country’s largest guerrilla group in Havana, Cuba."
— hace 2 años
"A Southern Pulse report on the Mexico city of Guadalajara provides the framework to better understand both present events — such as the series of roadblocks in Jalisco state this past weekend that sparked concerns of a return to bloody times of 2011 — and the future."
— hace 2 años
Calling the Zetas a drug cartel isn’t exactly false – drug trafficking is one of the Zetas’ main sources of revenue. But it’s a bit misleading. For one, the Zetas aren’t just involved with drugs, and narcotics may not even make up a majority of the cartel’s revenue. (Though it’s still a lot.) In addition to drugs, the cartel extorts businesses, kidnaps people for ransom and steals oil from Mexico’s state-owned oil company Pemex, among other tactics. (vía How the U.S. Fights the Zeta Cartel, From Spies to Sanctions | Danger Room | Wired.com)

Calling the Zetas a drug cartel isn’t exactly false – drug trafficking is one of the Zetas’ main sources of revenue. But it’s a bit misleading. For one, the Zetas aren’t just involved with drugs, and narcotics may not even make up a majority of the cartel’s revenue. (Though it’s still a lot.) In addition to drugs, the cartel extorts businesses, kidnaps people for ransom and steals oil from Mexico’s state-owned oil company Pemex, among other tactics. (vía How the U.S. Fights the Zeta Cartel, From Spies to Sanctions | Danger Room | Wired.com)

— hace 2 años